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Thursday, August 28, 2014

How Long Does Wrought Iron Last?

Wrought iron has become an exceptionally popular material for both commercial and residential projects, and this is due to the many advantages it has over other metals, wood, and brick. For those that have begun their own project and are asking themselves how long does wrought iron last, here is a look at its average lifespan and some of the factors that will affect the durability of wrought iron.

Wrought iron can be integrated into almost any design imaginable, and this has made it one of the leading options for outdoor furniture, design fixtures, and fences. When properly cared for, wrought iron that is left outdoors will often last for well past an individual’s lifetime, often for 60 years or longer. There are some things to take into consideration, however, when it comes to the lifespan of wrought iron. Primarily, this will come down to its upkeep, maintenance, and the climate.

Due to the process in which wrought iron is created, there is a chance of weather damage over time. The aesthetic appeal of wrought iron comes from the slag, or a byproduct of removing the metal from stone. When these metals are twisted, they can become fibrous and show signs of weather damage in a relatively short period of time. In turn, this weather damage could lead to corrosion and rusting which is especially difficult to remove with this type of medal

Luckily, it only takes a small amount of maintenance to ensure that this does not happen and keep wrought products sturdy and attractive throughout the years. In areas with an excessive amount of rainfall, high humidity, or extreme changes in temperature, it is important to reapply paint or a protective sealant as often as possible. In moderate climates, sealants and paint will only need to be applied every few years. For those that would like their wrought iron to last as long as possible, it is also a good idea to occasionally inspect the wrought iron for any chips to the paint or sealant that will allow corrosion or rust to develop.

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